No Big Deal, But Google May Have Promoted a Contest to Get Kids’ Social Security Numbers

“Doodle-4-Google” is so much more than an art contest. Sure, the game, which received 33,000 entries last year, celebrates “the creativity of young people” by having them send in a drawing under the theme “What I’d like to do someday …” But, there’s another component, as well. It also helps Google collect some very personal data on students K through 12. Along with the submission, the contest’s initial Parent Consent Form asked for the child’s city of birth (not current city, mind you), date of birth, the last four digits of the child’s social security number, as well as complete contact info for the parents. Bob Bowdon, who directed The Cartel, a documentary about corruption in the public-school system explained the significance:

 

You see what Google knows and many parents don’t know is that a person’s city of birth and year of birth can be used to make a statistical guess about the first five digits of his/her social security number. Then, if you can somehow obtain those last four SSN digits explicitly — voila, you’ve unlocked countless troves of personal information from someone who didn’t even understand that such a disclosure was happening.

 

If the information Google culled from the contest was linked with other databases to target ads, it could prove lucrative for the company, which enlists promotional help from schools by offering prize money. But Bowdon says he has no evidence that Google has used what it learned for marketing purposes. Not to mention the fact that statistical guessing seems more manpower intensive than the type of passive data collection Google usually prefers (oh, hey there, Street View camera). However, within 26 hours of alerting the FTC, Google updated its consent form eliminating the request for the last four digits of the kid’s social security number but leaving in the question about birth city. Okay, class. Who wants to send in a doodle under the theme “Be sort of evil until someone figures it out”?

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I wear many hats but history, economics and political observance have always been a passion. I am a graduate of the University of Cincinnati College of Business with a degree in Information Systems and Digital Business with a minor in European History. I work for a small mom-and-pop IT consulting and software design company. We deal in servicing mostly government funded non-profit mental and behavioral health care agencies in the state of Ohio. In this I deal with Medicaid and Medicare funds and have a little insight on the boondoggles of government there. Thankfully the undemanding nature of my daily profession gives me ample time to read and stay aware of our current state of affairs which I find stranger than fiction in many instances. In addition to being in the IT field, I have also been self employed with a small contracting company so I might know a thing or two about the plight of small business that employs 71% of the American workforce. I however don't draw my knowledge from my day jobs, which I have had a few; I draw it from an intense obsession with facts and observation about the world in which I live. I do have formal education in things such as history, economics and finance particularly as it pertains to global issues, but I have come to find much of what I thought I knew from the formalities of a state university I had to unlearn through much time and independent research. I hope you enjoy what I bring you which is not often heard in the mainstream news outlets. I would like to think my own personal editorializing is not only edifying but thought provoking while not at all obnoxious. That last one may be a hard to achieve.

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