46 US Warships Plus 7,000 US Marines On Route To Costa Rica?

On the 2nd July 2010 the Costa Rica Congress authorized the entry of 46 U.S. warships capable of carrying 200 helicopters and warplanes, plus 7,000 U.S. Marines “who may circulate the country in uniform without any restrictions” , plus submarine killer ships to the Costa Rican coast for “anti-narcotics operations and humanitarian missions’ between 1st July 2010 until 31st December 2010.

With this kind of nation destroying firepower, it gives real meaning to the expression “war on drugs”, but if this a real six month “war on drugs” we should expect to see some fantastic results, right?

Politicians representing the Acción Ciudadana (PAC), the Unidad Social Cristiana (PUSC) and the Frente Amplio (FA) political parties opposed the measure saying that the destructive force of the ships, helicopters and 7,000 US Marines is “disproportionate for the fight against drug trafficking.”

On Sunday, the President of Costa Rica Laura Chinchilla said that the government does not intend to militarize the fight against drugs and the Minister of Public Security Jose Maria Tijerino stressed that this huge, powerful military force would be under the command of the US Coast Guard and not the US Navy.

Although I don’t suppose the Costa Ricans, the drug traffickers or we expats will notice the difference…

A few of the thoughts that raced through my mind?

  1. To my knowledge at the present time, Costa Rica is not suffering from any “humanitarian” crisis.
  2. The article did not make it clear what sort of “humanitarian missions” might take place.
  3. The article did not mention where any “humanitarian mission” might take place.
  4. Based on the truly horrific, drug crime related slaughters we have witnessed in Mexico, wouldn’t it be better conducting these kinds of heavy weapon “anti-narcotics operations” in northern Mexico?
  5. With what is probably the world’s worst environmental disaster going on right now in the Gulf of Mexico, surely it would be more appropriate to conduct “humanitarian missions” in the Gulf?
  6. On 10th July 2010 it was also announced that: “Honduras will build a new military base in the Caribbean, in addition to another military base built with funding from the U.S.A in the same region with the pretext of fighting drug trafficking.” Last April Washington invested $2 million in a base in near the border with Nicaragua the military base is “under the supervision of the U.S. Southern Command.”
  7. Since U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) is based in Miami, Florida, could these crucial warships and the 7,000 US Marines be fleeing from something far more dangerous that is about to happen in the Gulf of Mexico?
  8. SOUTHCOM’s “area of responsibility… encompasses 31 countries and 10 territories. The region represents about one-sixth of the landmass of the world assigned to regional unified commands. What exactly they are responsible for is not explained.
  9. The article did not make it clear whether these vessels would be patrolling off the Pacific or Atlantic coast but either way, is it possible they are on their way to Venezuela? Either as a show of force or something more serious?
  10. Does anyone know if any of these ships carry nuclear weapons?
SOUTHCOM's "area of responsibility"

SOUTHCOM’s “area of responsibility”

Another politician Francisco Chacón defended the arrival of the US forces saying that “they would give humanitarian support, build schools and fight against drug traffickers.”

If these 7,000 US Marines, 200 helicopters, warplanes and submarine killers are coming to Costa Rica to “give humanitarian support, build schools and fight against drug traffickers,” perhaps we could ask them to repair the new highway to Caldera? With that kind of manpower they could have it finished in a week.

But seriously, what do you think is going on?

 http://www.welovecostarica.com/public/46_US_Warships_Plus_7000_US_Marines_On_Route_To_Costa_Rica.cfm

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